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What makes improvement a steady, continuous cycle?

By Cory Arbogast on Nov 21, 2017 3:30:00 PM

Manufacturing companies have a saying, that is, “if you’re doing the same thing you were doing 3 years ago, you are losing money”. Nothing is truer for an industry that requires companies to flow with the current of technology advances and industry standards.

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How can you put a square peg into a round hole?

By Cory Arbogast on Nov 7, 2017 3:33:00 PM

It’s well-known that trying to fit a square peg into a round hole (or round mold) is a useless effort. In fact, a lot of people might call it idiocy. But thirty years ago, Pleasant Precision took that as a challenge. What resulted was innovation. Be it square parts, circular parts, or crazy oblong parts, Round Mate® is the go-to answer.

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The Four Plastic Variables

By Ken Jenkins on Mar 29, 2016 9:31:40 AM

When building plastic parts, consistency is key. Variables need to be recognized, so that a quality product is created, every time. A good part is made up of four things: the part design itself, the mold design, the material, and how it’s processed.

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Topics: plastic

Oil to plastic: A lesson on how plastic is made

By Ron Pleasant on Mar 13, 2016 10:24:00 AM

When it comes to plastic, times have certainly changed. While 40 years ago anything made with plastic was considered cheap. Today there are thousands of plastic products, including things like computer housings, automobile parts, and medical parts.

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Topics: Mold Components

The Basics of Drying Thermoplastic Materials

By Ron Pleasant on Feb 26, 2016 10:36:00 AM

Moisture affects the quality of the molded part in different ways, and the extent is determined by either the specific resin being processed or the purpose of the part. Improper or incomplete drying can create problems, either when the part is being processed or when the product is in use, or sometimes, both.

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Topics: injection molding

Injection Molding for Productivity

By Ron Pleasant on Feb 15, 2016 12:51:00 PM

The objective of injection molding is to produce identical moldings at the specified quality each and every time. Repeatability is the key: setup, process, inspection, repeat.

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Topics: injection molding

What is the difference between nylons? Pt. 2

By Ron Pleasant on Jan 28, 2016 11:43:13 AM

We recently wrote about the differences between Nylon 6 and Nylon 6,6. Now we want to discuss the differences between Nylon 4,6, Nylon 11, and Nylon 12 and differentiating them from Nylon 6 and Nylon 6,6.

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Topics: Mold Components

What is the difference between nylons?

By Ron Pleasant on Jan 14, 2016 10:27:48 AM

Nylons are semi-crystalline resins with a very low viscosity at melting point, excellent chemical resistance, good temperature resistance, and good toughness (moisture). There are 8 types of nylons: Nylon 6; Nylon 6,6; Nylon 4,6; Nylon 6,9; Nylon 6,10; Nylon 6,12; Nylon 11; and Nylon 12.

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Topics: Mold Components

Introduction to Injection Molding

By Ken Jenkins on Dec 28, 2015 11:09:33 AM

Injection molding is the processing method used in 75% of the plastics industry. It is used to convert raw plastic to useful shapes for all types of industries including the automobile industry. Although there is a substantial upfront investment, injection molding is beneficial because the cost is low after the initial investment.

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Topics: injection molding

Thermoplastic Materials vs. Thermosets

By Ron Pleasant on Dec 14, 2015 10:21:31 AM

Plastic, coming from the Greek “plastikos” meaning “capable of being shaped and molded”: we use it multiple times daily, but what do you know about it? You may be surprised to learn just how advanced plastic is; for example, a fleece jacket can be made from 25 recycled plastic drink bottles. Did you know there are two families of plastics? Thermoplastics and thermosets make up the two families. There are several characteristics of each that differentiate the two. Thermoplastics soften when heated and harden when cooled, can be re-softened and reformed repeatedly, and have a limited upper service temperature. Thermosets harden when heated, cannot be re-softened or reprocessed, and have a high upper service temperature.

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Topics: Mold Components

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